2022 · Days of The Week · Wildlife Wednesday

Greater Roadrunner (Geococcyx californianus)

Although the Greater Roadrunner occurs throughout Texas, is well known, is the topic of much folklore, and is a very popular cartoon character, the only field research studies that have been conducted are in desert scrub or brush-grassland habitats in South Texas. As a popular multicultural iconic bird, from prehistory to modern times, it is surprising that it was one of the last bird species to be given state protection because of the mistaken belief that roadrunners were a threat to declining quail populations.

Resource: https://txtbba.tamu.edu/species-accounts/greater-roadrunner/

2022 · Connecticut · My Travel Journal · Texas

Sell A House; Buy A House ~ May 2021

Texas

Exactly one year ago was a bittersweet day. We finalized everything by signing the Texas house over to the new owner. It was our home for nearly 16 years. And we’ve raised our girls in this place. The Colony is a great community to raise children. It has great schools with an awesome ISD (Independent School District). The shops are close to home. But our street is still quiet. We will miss our good old home and community. At the same time, we are very grateful for still having a job during this pandemic. Even when it brings us to a completely different area in this country.

Connecticut

Before we signed the papers for purchasing the home in Watertown, we got a chance to look at the house inside. I saw it only in photos and on a live camera, when Kevin and the Real Estate Agent walked through the place. Finally, I’ve got a visible dimension of the house and the property. We saw what needs to be changed and how we have to approach it. In the afternoon, we signed the papers at the title company in Oakville, which is still a part of Watertown.

2022 · Days of The Week · Wildlife Wednesday

Red-eared Slider (Trachemys scripta elegans) 

Red-eared sliders are Texas’s most common aquatic turtles. These turtles get their name from a broad red stripe behind their eye and their habit of sliding off rocks and logs when startled. Older turtles are often covered with a thick coat of algae. Some red-eared sliders can live more than 30 years.

Sliders are cold-blooded and spend hours sunning themselves on rocks and logs. If there are not enough rocks or logs for all of them, they will often stack themselves one on top of the other! They bury themselves in loose soil or mud during the winter to escape the cold. When population numbers get high, these turtles move across land to other bodies of water in search of food and space. They eat aquatic plants, small fish, and decaying material.

Sliders have poor hearing but are very sensitive to vibrations. This makes it hard to sneak up on them. Their name, slider, comes from the fact that they are quick to slide off rocks, logs or the banks if danger threatens.

Resource: https://tpwd.texas.gov/huntwild/wild/species/slider/